We have had 123 submissions for talks and posters, and everyone has now been notified of the result.  The meeting planner is available on the  meeting website, and the full schedule will be available soon.  Click here for details.

The organisers would like to remind you that the early bird registration date is approaching  - April 29th, 2019. 

Recipients of student travel awards must register by then to take advantage of their award.  if you have applied for an award but have not been notified of the results, please let us know via the 'contact us' page (see left)  

If you haven't booked a hotel, this is the right time to choose one. The deadline for some of our accommodation proposals is only available until May1st.  Please check the accommodation page

We are looking forward to see you in Riga!

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Register soon for the Riga meeting.  Please click here to visit the meeting website, or click below to see more details.

Color Vision 2020

Submission Opens: 1 Oct 2019

Submission Deadline: 1 Nov 2019

This feature issue of JOSA A is based on the 2019 Symposium of the International Colour Vision Society (ICVS) to be held in Riga, Latvia, 5-9 July 2019 (https://www.icvs2019.lu.lv/). While meeting participants are particularly encouraged to submit their work, the feature is open to all other researchers in the related area.

We are pleased to announce that the 2019 Verriest Medal will be awarded to Professor Michael Webster at its 25th Biennial Symposium, to be held in Riga, Latvia from July 5-9, 2019.

A SPLASH OF COLOUR

1. Seeing neurons  in the living human eye

Using techniques borrowed from astronomy, vision scientists can take high-resolution images of the retina, the fine layer of cells in the back of your eye.

With Hannah Smithson and Laura Young

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A SPLASH OF COLOUR

2. Neurons code the colours we see

All activity in your brain – including those which mediates your perception of colour – is based on electrical messages between neurons. Vision scientists can measure these signals at the eye, and at the back of the brain. 

With Neil Parry.

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A SPLASH OF COLOUR

3. More than meets the eye: hyperspectral imaging

How many colours we see is limited by our eye, which contains only three types of colour sensors. Using advanced techniques, vision scientists can take images of this “invisible” information and make it visible.

With Sérgio Nascimento.

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